Colon Cancer Screening Rates Increase, Researchers Speculate Cause

Increased colon cancer screenings could be because of Obamacare

The Affordable Care Act may have increased rates of colon cancer screening among poorer Americans, a new study suggests.

Researchers discovered that overall cancer screening rates among people ages 50 to 75 improved from about 57 percent in 2008 to about 61 percent in 2013, based on data from the National Health Interview Survey. The increase was seen mostly with those of low income, low education level, and Medicare coverage, the study found.

While the study could not prove a strong cause and effect, the Affordable Care Act was signed into law in 2010, and researchers believe that screening rates increased because of the reduced financial burden under the Act. 

Screenings can be lifesaving for people between the ages of 50 and 75. Talk to your doctor about different screening options and be seen, get screened!  

Other News from Around the Web:

  • Christopher 2X becomes a colon cancer advocate as he lends a hand in the new documentary, "Catching a Killer."
  • New risk factors may lead to unforeseen complications after colonoscopies, new research suggests. 
  • Colon cancer screenings have increased, but a new law threatens access to screenings under Medicare
  • First-degree relatives of colon cancer patients are less likely to get screened, even though they are at higher risk, a new study shows. 

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Topics: Colon Cancer News