Colon Cancer: It's Not Just a Man's Disease

women_colon_cancer

In a recent article published in Huffington Post, the Society for Women's Health Research dispels one extremely important misconception about colon cancer: it is not just a man's disease.

According to the American Cancer Society, an estimated 142,570 Americans will be diagnosed with colorectal cancer in 2016. 68,830 - 48% - of those people will be women.Of the estimated 49,190 individuals that will die from the disease this year, 23,170 (about 47%) will be women.

Colon cancer is the third most common cancer among men and women in the U.S. Contrary to popular belief, women share nearly half of that cancer burden.

Colon cancer is different from other common cancers in that men and women share many of the same risk factors for the disease. Obesity, physical inactivity, heavy alcohol and tobacco use, significant red meat consumption, and family history are all gender-neutral factors that can increase a person's risk of developing colorectal cancer.

Screening for breast cancer has become a widely popular topic for discussion among women in recent years. However, it's critical for women to recognize that colon cancer screening is just as important. Screening can stop the development of colon cancer in its tracks if polyps are detected in a pre-cancerous phase.

Remind your mothers, sisters, friends and loved ones to stay up to date with their colon cancer screening as well as screening for other common cancers!

Other News From Around the Web

Image Source: Michael Fertig via Pexels

doctors-colon-cancer

Topics: Colon Cancer News

1Cancer Facts and Figures 2016 (2016): n. pag. Cancer.org. American Cancer Society. Web.